So Much For That Whole HGH Menace

The Face of HGH is Douchey

I’ve always been a bit dubious on the purported effects of performance enhancing drugs when it comes to baseball. Sure, steroids can turn players in to muscled up monsters, but its not like it enhances hand eye coordination or reflexes. Besides, with factors such as a juiced ball, smaller parks, and a lowered pitchers mound, it’s not that easy to isolate PEDs as the sole source of increased offense. The real benefit is in recovery time from injuries. The effects of HGH are even more dubious, but since there was no test for until recently and the sports media is somehow more incompetent than the general news media (an amazing feat) it’s been sold to us as a kind of super steroid that could turn your or me into Barry Bonds INSTANTLY. Well, the first player ever has tested positive for HGH:

Colorado Rockies minor leaguer Mike Jacobs carved his name in drug-testing history Thursday by becoming the first North American professional athlete to be suspended for testing positive for human growth hormone.

Jacobs, who has been playing for the Rockies’ Triple-A affiliate in Colorado Springs, was suspended for 50 games, effective immediately. The 30-year-old first baseman has played for the New York MetsFlorida Marlins and Kansas City Royals, but hasn’t appeared in the major leagues at all this season.

According to the commissioner’s office, Jacobs is the first athlete in any North American professional sport to test positive for HGH.

Well, I don’t know about you, but I feel safer already. Mike Jacobs is a first baseman, he has played in the majors for five seasons, and in those five seasons he has compiled a total WAR (wins above replacement) of 0.7. That makes him pretty much the definition of a replacement player, meaning major league roster fodder, a generic guy who would be called up from AAA to replace an injured player for a short period. I would say it’s safe to say that the whole HGH thing might be tad overblown.

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Posted on August 19, 2011, in Baseball and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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